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35th Maine Loon Count
Registration Unavailable

35th Maine Loon Count

Price not
available
Calendar Next session starts Jul 21, 2018 at 7 am

On the morning of the third Saturday of July each year, over 1,000 volunteers venture onto lakes and ponds across the state to count loons. The observations recorded by our citizen scientist volunteers provide an excellent snapshot of Maine’s loon population.

The 2018 Loon Count will take place on Saturday, July 21. To sign up, contact Susan Gallo at 207.781.6180 x216 or sgallo@maineaudubon.org.
Please send her your name, address, and the lake or general area where you would like to count. We will be in touch in the spring with details.

AARP Canoe Tour

$575
Calendar Next session starts Aug 1, 2018 at 1 pm
1 additional session on Aug 1, 2018

Join us for a canoe tour especially for AARP members.  We will meet at the nature center and canoe together on the Dunstan River looking at the migrating birds and the other wildife of the marsh.

Must be AARP members to register for this event.  To join AARP go to: https://states.aarp.org/region/maine/

Borestone Mountain Art and Writing Retreat

$800
Calendar Next session starts Sep 23, 2018
1 additional session on Sep 23, 2018

Instructors: Alan Bray (Art) & Kimberly Ridley (Writing)

This inaugural retreat is part of a collaboration between Maine Audubon and Monson Arts. Taking place over four days in September at Maine Audubon’s Borestone Mountain Audubon Sanctuary, participants will engage in intensive study in either writing or art, gathering together for meals and staying in the sanctuary’s rustic, secluded lodges at the base of Borestone Mountain. 10 students in each discipline will enjoy a communal 5-day/4-night retreat away from modern distractions to focus on their individual creative work.

 

About Borestone:

The Borestone Mountain Audubon Sanctuary features spectacular lodges located between Midday and Sunset Ponds. Designed and built in the early 1900s and recently renovated with modern kitchen and bath facilities, the four lodges are authentic, rustic, Adirondack-style log buildings. 

Meals will be provided. These are all shared bunk rooms with twin, bunk beds, or a few double beds. Please see the room chart and photos of the lodge rooms on our website. Room preferences will be accommodated based on the order of student registration.

Once a student has registered for the retreat, a staff member will be in touch to confirm preferences and logistics. Information about scholarship opportunities is available for students and others upon request. 

For questions regarding the workshops please contact, Dan Bouthot at Monson Arts, programmanger@monsonarts.org.

For questions regarding the accommodations, please contact Beth Pauls at Maine Audubon, bpauls@maineaudubon.org.

There is no internet or cell phone connectivity at the Borestone Lodges.

Monson Arts is a new artists' residency and arts workshop program being developed in Monson with the support of the Libra Foundation. Learn more at monsonarts.org.

 

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTORS

“Drawing/Painting at Borestone Mountain” with Alan Bray

The lodges on Borestone Mt. are a spectacular place, located in a bowl shaped depression, which holds three small ponds halfway to the top of the mountain. It is a place of great beauty and a profound silence from the everyday world. This workshop is open to any medium you prefer as long as you can carry it in your pack. There are no studios as such but ample room on the porches and of course on the mountain and the grounds. This will be an opportunity to immerse oneself in the study of a natural world that has been untouched for 100 years or more.

Alan Bray was born in 1946 in Waterville, Maine. He grew up in Monson, Maine, and attended the Art Institute of Boston, The University of Southern Maine, and earned a MA in Painting from The Villa Schiffanoia Graduate School of Fine Art in Florence, Italy. He currently lives and works in Sangerville, Maine, and is represented by Garvey/Simon Art Access in New York and Caldbeck Gallery in Rockland, Maine. http://www.alanbray.com/

 

“Wild Words: Nature Writing” with Kimberly Ridley

“We may not have wings or leaves, but we humans do have words. Language is our gift and our responsibility. I’ve come to think of writing as an act of reciprocity with the living land.” –Robin Wall Kimmerer, Braiding Sweetgrass

How do we awaken to the wild world around us and find the words to share what we discover? How do we weave personal history and natural history into a greater whole to better understand ourselves and mend the rifts between humans and the rest of nature?

We will write our way into these questions as we observe and explore the Sanctuary’s forests, mountains, and ponds. Through the work of writers such as Robin Wall Kimmerer, Barry Lopez, Terry Tempest Williams, and others, we will examine craft and a range of styles and approaches to writing about nature. Generative writing exercises will provide opportunities to experiment with new ways of seeing and writing about nature and make new connections between our own stories and the wild world around us.

Kimberly Ridley is a science writer, naturalist, and former magazine editor whose essays and articles have appeared in Downeast Magazine, The Christian Science Monitor, The Boston Globe, and many other publications. She has worked with scores of emerging and established writers in bringing stories of hope, wildness, and possibility into the world. A Maine native, Kimberly is the author of award-winning nature books for children. She lives in Brooklin, Maine with her husband, the painter Tom Curry. http://www.kimberlyridley.org

Nature Tuesday Group
Registration Unavailable

Nature Tuesday Group

Free
Calendar Next session starts Jul 24, 2018 at 1:30 pm
1 additional session on Aug 7, 2018

July 24, 1:30 - 3 pm

This outing will take place at the beach, Southern Maine Communnity College and Willard, and we may talk about a variety of topics from geology to seaweeds and shore plants. We will meet at the parking for Spring Point Light at 1:30, and walk until 3.

Everyone is welcome. It is free and no preregistration is necessary.  If you have them, bring binoculars and 10x lens. We will walk in light drizzle, but not in heavy rain or thunderstorms. If you have questions, call 207-831-0651.

Parking and Directions

Stratton Island Trip
Registration Unavailable

Stratton Island Trip

$78
Calendar Next session starts Jul 19, 2018 at 8:30 am
1 additional session on Jul 19, 2018

Members $63, Non-members $78

Not far from the Scarborough shore, Stratton Island is a nesting colony and roosting site for a remarkable diversity of coastal birds. A project site of National Audubon’s internationally-recognized Seabird Restoration Program, Stratton is normally inaccessible to visitors. On these special outings, however, we will be able to land and have a uniquely intimate experience among the 1,000 pairs of terns.

Observation blinds provide remarkable photographic opportunities. The island’s extraordinary bird colony includes Common, Roseate, Arctic, and Least Terns; little blue heron; Black-crowned Night-Herons; Snowy and Great Egrets; Glossy Ibis; Blue-winged Teal; Gadwall, Sora; and one of Maine’s rarest breeding birds: the American Oystercatcher.

You will also hear the latest research from the seabird biologists and view the challenges they face spending a summer on an island. Participants must be able to get in and out of boats and inflatable dinghies for this trip.

Information Sheet

We will meet by the Lobster Co-op at Pine Point in Scarborough at least 15 minutes before the appointed time and will leave promptly on time.

(A portion of the fee includes a donation to the Sea Bird Restoration Project.)

Leaders:

Session 1 and 3 Linda Woodard

Session 2 Noah Gibb

Session 4 Doug Hitchcox

Thursday Morning Bird & Nature Walk
Registration Unavailable

Thursday Morning Bird & Nature Walk

$8

with Doug Hitchcox

Calendar Next session starts Jul 19, 2018 at 7 am
6 additional sessions through Aug 30, 2018

Location: Gilsland Farm

Join us each Thursday for an easy stroll through Maine Audubon’s Gilsland Farm Sanctuary.  We will walk the property primarily looking for birds but won’t ignore any other wildlife or plants. Bring your binoculars and dress to be comfortable outside for two hours. Our total walk is usually 1.8 miles but people can leave early if needed.

We meet near the main parking lot. If you arrive late we are typically by the pond for the first 15-20 minutes before heading into the West Meadow. Walks last approximately 2 hours.

A list of the most recent bird sightings from Gilsland Farm can be found here: ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L251783

Contact: Doug Hitchcox - (207) 781-2330 x237

What Have Loons Told Us? 35 Years of Maine Audubon’s Loon Count
Registration Unavailable

What Have Loons Told Us? 35 Years of Maine Audubon’s Loon Count

Free
Calendar Next session starts Aug 15, 2018 at 7 pm

Location: Somes-Meynell Wildlife Sanctuary, Mt. Desert

Thirty-five years ago, Mainers worried that loons on their lakes and ponds were disappearing. The Maine Audubon Annual Loon Count was born out of that concern, and today, 35 years later, and with the help of thousands of “citizen science” volunteers, we know that loons are definitely not disappearing. In fact, in many ways they are doing better than ever. This multi-media presentation covers the natural history of the Common Loon– from where they go in winter to where they build their nests and what they feed their young – as well as the many lessons learned over 35 years of loon counting with thousands of volunteers. While we’ve answered many loon conservation questions, many more remain. Learn about the history of this innovative project, and the things you can do to help make Maine an even better place for loons to thrive in the future.

What Have Loons Told Us? 35 Years of Maine Audubon’s Loon Count
Registration Unavailable

What Have Loons Told Us? 35 Years of Maine Audubon’s Loon Count

Free
Calendar Next session starts Aug 18, 2018 at 11 am

Location: Raymond, ME

Thirty-five years ago, Mainers worried that loons on their lakes and ponds were disappearing. The Maine Audubon Annual Loon Count was born out of that concern, and today, 35 years later, and with the help of thousands of “citizen science” volunteers, we know that loons are definitely not disappearing. In fact, in many ways they are doing better than ever. This multi-media presentation covers the natural history of the Common Loon– from where they go in winter to where they build their nests and what they feed their young – as well as the many lessons learned over 35 years of loon counting with thousands of volunteers. While we’ve answered many loon conservation questions, many more remain. Learn about the history of this innovative project, and the things you can do to help make Maine an even better place for loons to thrive in the future.





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