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35th Maine Loon Count
Registration Unavailable

35th Maine Loon Count

Price not
available
Calendar Next session starts Jul 21, 2018 at 7 am

On the morning of the third Saturday of July each year, over 1,000 volunteers venture onto lakes and ponds across the state to count loons. The observations recorded by our citizen scientist volunteers provide an excellent snapshot of Maine’s loon population.

The 2018 Loon Count will take place on Saturday, July 21. To sign up, contact Susan Gallo at 207.781.6180 x216 or sgallo@maineaudubon.org.
Please send her your name, address, and the lake or general area where you would like to count. We will be in touch in the spring with details.

Bald Eagles of Merrymeeting Bay 2018

$85

with Doug Hitchcox

Calendar Next session starts Sep 22, 2018 at 8 am

Members: $60, Nonmembers: $85

Location: Boothbay Harbor

When Maine Audubon first began running this trip in 1969, sighting one or two eagles was all that could be expected. Since then, the Bald Eagle population has rebounded from the devastating effects of pesticide poisoning, and during last year’s trip we observed 66 eagles!

We will board the boat in Boothbay Harbor for a trip across Sheepscot Bay to the Sasanoa River then up the Kennebec River to Merrymeeting Bay. Weather and tides permitting, we will return to Boothbay via the Kennebec. The sheltered tidal waters of Midcoast Maine offer some of the most pleasant and scenic cruising to be found anywhere—plus excellent wildlife watching. In addition to bald eagles, expect other raptors, seals, sturgeon, shorebirds, and waterfowl along the way.

Important information about this trip: Coming soon!

 

Growing Up WILD

$25

with Linda Woodard

Calendar Next session starts Jul 25, 2018 at 9 am

Member: $23, Nonmember: $25

Growing Up WILD is a resource that is invaluable for early childhood professionals. With growing recognition of the need for young children to spend time outdoors, this guide provides practical suggestions for planning activities that are developmentally appropriate and includes all educational domains.

Developed with the vision of changing the culture of early childhood education to embrace learning in the outdoors, Growing Up WILD is the first nationally distributed early childhood professional development program and activity guide that integrates environmental education into the early childhood curriculum.

The activity guide, Growing Up WILD: Exploring Nature with Young Children:

•Is written especially for early childhood educators of children ages 3-7. 

 •Features 27 field-tested, hands-on, nature-based, ready-made thematic units and over 400 experiences in a full-color 11”x17” activity guide.

•Includes outdoor explorations, scientific inquiry, art projects, music and movement, conservation activities, reading and math connections and "Healthy Me" dovetailing with the Let's Move Campaign.

•Involves social, emotional, physical, language, and cognitive domains to help foster learning and development in all areas.

•Supports developmentally appropriate practice allowing children to learn at levels that are individually, socially, and culturally appropriate.

•Is correlated to the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Standards and the Head Start Domains.

Contact hours provided.

If you need to make a payment with a method other than credit card, please call Beth Pauls at 207-781-2330 ext. 273 to register.

Nature Tuesday Group
Registration Unavailable

Nature Tuesday Group

Free
Calendar Next session starts Jul 24, 2018 at 1:30 pm
1 additional session on Aug 7, 2018

July 24, 1:30 - 3 pm

This outing will take place at the beach, Southern Maine Communnity College and Willard, and we may talk about a variety of topics from geology to seaweeds and shore plants. We will meet at the parking for Spring Point Light at 1:30, and walk until 3.

Everyone is welcome. It is free and no preregistration is necessary.  If you have them, bring binoculars and 10x lens. We will walk in light drizzle, but not in heavy rain or thunderstorms. If you have questions, call 207-831-0651.

Parking and Directions

What Have Loons Told Us? 35 Years of Maine Audubon’s Loon Count
Registration Unavailable

What Have Loons Told Us? 35 Years of Maine Audubon’s Loon Count

Free
Calendar Next session starts Aug 15, 2018 at 7 pm

Location: Somes-Meynell Wildlife Sanctuary, Mt. Desert

Thirty-five years ago, Mainers worried that loons on their lakes and ponds were disappearing. The Maine Audubon Annual Loon Count was born out of that concern, and today, 35 years later, and with the help of thousands of “citizen science” volunteers, we know that loons are definitely not disappearing. In fact, in many ways they are doing better than ever. This multi-media presentation covers the natural history of the Common Loon– from where they go in winter to where they build their nests and what they feed their young – as well as the many lessons learned over 35 years of loon counting with thousands of volunteers. While we’ve answered many loon conservation questions, many more remain. Learn about the history of this innovative project, and the things you can do to help make Maine an even better place for loons to thrive in the future.

What Have Loons Told Us? 35 Years of Maine Audubon’s Loon Count
Registration Unavailable

What Have Loons Told Us? 35 Years of Maine Audubon’s Loon Count

Free
Calendar Next session starts Aug 18, 2018 at 11 am

Location: Raymond, ME

Thirty-five years ago, Mainers worried that loons on their lakes and ponds were disappearing. The Maine Audubon Annual Loon Count was born out of that concern, and today, 35 years later, and with the help of thousands of “citizen science” volunteers, we know that loons are definitely not disappearing. In fact, in many ways they are doing better than ever. This multi-media presentation covers the natural history of the Common Loon– from where they go in winter to where they build their nests and what they feed their young – as well as the many lessons learned over 35 years of loon counting with thousands of volunteers. While we’ve answered many loon conservation questions, many more remain. Learn about the history of this innovative project, and the things you can do to help make Maine an even better place for loons to thrive in the future.





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